Awakening Sexuality & Activism for Women's Rights

Anatomy: The Female Prostate of Myth and Legend


The female prostate is a complex subject confounded by myth, male-dominated science, and male misconceptions of female anatomy and sexuality.

The female prostate is a gland of tissue that surrounds the women’s urethra, the tube that goes from the bladder to the opening of the body in the groin region so a woman can urinate.

This gland used to be called Skene’s Gland. Much like the myth of Christopher Columbus “discovering” America (the indigenous people already knew this land existed), since the female prostate was not invented or really discovered by “Skene,” the proper name is the female prostate. This is also the gland responsible for the taboo subject of female ejaculation.

A hundred years ago, Western science still maintained that women were incapable of orgasm. In fact, women used to go to their doctor regularly for manual stimulation to “fix” their “hysterium.”  Some women would have their hysterium “removed,” a procedure we still call a hyster-ectomy (removal of the hysterium).

Obviously more important to American society is the male penis. Big Pharma corporation Pfizer spent millions developing Viagra, which has been on the market since 1998. In 2008, Viagra earned $1.934 billion in sales in the U.S. (yes, that’s billion with a “B”). Imagine if TV and magazine ads promoted female ejaculation as readily as they promote Viagra?

Reinier De Graaf was the first to accurately find and describe the female prostate in 1672, noting how the gland produced a “pituitoserous juice.”  Western medicine did not fully accept the “female prostate” as a legitimate body part until 2001, when the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology voted to refer to the Skene’s Gland as the “female prostate” from that point forward in their reference book Histology Terminology.

It wasn’t until 2007 that Austrian urologists proclaimed they had indeed found the female prostate using ultrasound imaging. They had imaged two pre-menopausal women, ages 44 and 45, who had reported fluid expulsion during orgasm. Now, here at the beginning of 2012, we are still learning about the female prostate. But like most of the sexual organs, the female and the male have sympathetic sex organs, glands, anatomy, nerves, and purposes.

In the preface to The Hite Report: A Nationwide Study on Female Sexuality, Shere Hite directly addresses why it has taken so long for advances in understanding female sexual anatomy and ergo female sexuality.

“Women have never been asked how they felt about sex. Researchers, looking for statistical “norms”, have asked all the wrong questions for all the wrong reasons — and all too often wound up telling women how they should feel instead of asking how they do feel. Female sexuality has been seen essentially as a response to male sexuality and intercourse. There has rarely been any acknowledgment that female sexuality might have a complex nature of its own which would be more than just the logical counterpart of (what we think of as) male sexuality.”

The female prostate is known to have two primary functions: produce and store prostatic fluid as well as release hormones, such as serotonin.  The female prostate may be influenced by estrogens in the body, just as the male’s prostate is affected by levels of androgens in his body.  The female prostate may also be affected by DHEA, which is a precursor to hormones such as estrogen and androgen.  The suggestion has also been made that female ejaculate has an anti-microbial function for the urethra, protecting the woman from urinary tract infections.  This close proximity of the prostate and the urethra helps explain why urinating can feel very pleasant or even orgasmic.

The female prostate blends with the anterior wall of the vagina and can be felt with the fingers. While no two women are the same, for many women the prostate is readily noticeable by its ridgy texture — think of corduroy fabric.

The female prostate that is inside of the vagina is also home to the Goddess-Spot (G-Spot, a.k.a. Grafenberg Spot). But the G-Spot is only one little spot, sometimes just a little flap of tissue, whereas the prostate is a larger area of vaginal real estate. Direct stimulation can make the ridges even more pronounced, so if you don’t notice the prostate or the G-Spot at first, they may be noticeable after some stimulation — another great reason for foreplay!

As with any play that happens within the vagina, use clean hands, clean toys, and never use scented oils, lube, or lotions inside the vagina.

trish

For more of my personal orgasm journey, read Trish’s Daily O.J.
Visit the AW site: Aroused Woman

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