Arts, Activism, Awakening in Mind, Body, & Spirit

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NEWS: ArousedWoman Magazine PRE-SALE Premiere Issue or All 6 Issues


ArousedWoman MagazineComing soon!  ArousedWoman Magazine will hit the cyber-newsstands in August 2014.

You can pre-order and get yours reserved for $9.99.  Or get a subscription for all 6 bimonthly issues for just $49.99.

In order to be truly happy, you have to be happy (and healthy) on several levels.   The best way to accomplish this is with solid information so you can make informed decisions about your life, your body, your rights, and your peace of mind in this crazy, hectic world.

AW Magazine will be a digital publication, readable on any computer or mobile device.  The premiere August/September issue will be released in August 2014.

An extension of AW Blog and AW Radio, AW Mag is an in-depth look at various topics for women (and men!), including sex, health, fitness, nutrition, feminism/activism, original erotica, guest writers, spirituality, reviews, and more!

The August/September 2014 issue will feature articles and interviews on the topics:

  • Body image
  • California women’s Reiki healing center
  • Radiant pleasure
  • Finding our way back from patriarchy
  • Goddess-based spirituality
  • The new Atheism
  • Classical Tantra
  • Activist film festivals
  • Revolutionary Feminism
  • Painting female nudes
  • Healing yourself through meditation
  • Knowing your vagina
  • Massage & the importance of touch
  • Breast Health
  • Protecting your clit
  • Orgasm tips
  • New AskTrish letters
  • Sexual health
  • Overall nutrition
  • Recipes
  • Original erotica
  • Guest articles
  • OpEd pieces
  • Reviews
  • AND MORE!

Every issue will have new articles, new guests, new important health coverage, and new original erotica!

Pay using your PayPal account or your credit or debit card:

And please SPREAD THE WORD by sharing the link to this blog post.  Thank you!

trish

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Dream: Losing My Hair and Going Bald


swept-in-a-bubbly-dream-gun-leglerThis morning I awoke from a dream, the kind I haven’t had in a while and a very specific kind I have never had.  Ever.  I dreamt all of my hair was gone, and I was bald.

My hair has been a distinguishing feature of mine since I was a child.  Hair stylists naturally gravitate to my tresses and touch my hair without asking.  But these guys are almost always gay, and they’re more interested in my hair than me, so I never really minded them.

However, on too many occasions to recount, I have been standing or sitting, minding my own business, only to feel something strange happening to the back of my head and realize some stranger was groping and fondling my hair.  From a guy at the mall when I was 12 — who wound my hair around and around his arm and said, “I’m sorry, I couldn’t help myself”, to which I replied, “Oh, yes, you could have!” — to a creepo, sleazy, fat guy with one tooth at the circus who operated one of the rides, men are drawn to my hair.  An artist wanted to paint me nude because of my skin tone and my hair.  Because of these experiences over the years, my hair is definitely one of my sensitive spots.  These creepy follicular invaders somehow had the nerve to get offended that I was offended that they were touching and stroking my hair.  They would guffaw and sneer, “What do you care?  It’s just hair.  It’s dead.”

Newsflash:  As long as my hair is attached to my head, my hair is a part of my body and is off-limits to anyone unless I personally give permission for a person to touch my hair.  Period.

People are taught that hair is dead.  Sacred teachings say it is not.  In the ancient culture of the tribes of Ireland, Scotland, Gaul, and other European pagan traditions, hair was very sacred.  Most people never cut their hair; they let it grow their entire lives, for to cut your hair (nonchalantly) was to cut off your power.  In some instances just before major battles, some warriors might cut their hair as a sign of sacrifice to the gods, for blessing in battle.  They may also cut their hair while mourning.

The head was sacred to the indigenous tribes of pagan Europa.  The head is where we think, see, hear, smell, taste, talk, sing, kiss — all of which are extremely important to every person.  In fact, the head was so revered that warriors would take the heads of their enemies to prevent their power from transferring with the deceased to the Other Side.  If you’ve ever seen a depiction of the great mother goddess Kali from the Sanatana Dharma teachings, you know the head is a prized possession in several cultures.

Samson, from the Judeo-Christian bible, owed his considerable strength to his hair.  Some American Indian tribes have traditions that involve cutting their hair when a loved one has died.  Keeping the hair long is part of many yogic traditions that go back thousands of years.  The hair is thought to be like “antennae” to the surrounding environment, able to pick up on energetic vibrations, useful, informative sensations that are then transmitted to the brain.  Even beards were required of scholars in academia and holy men in some religions.

So hair has always been a very conscious matter to me…. The Broadway musical included.

Note:  I’ve never had a lucid dream, and the one dream in which I actively controlled what happened was a real doozy.  Oftentimes my dreams are like films, and at an important moment, I’ll get an extreme close-up, zoom-in shot to hone in on what is important.

I had already had my dreams for the night, gotten up to go to the bathroom, and gone back to bed, only to lay in bed for over an hour unable to fall asleep.  Sometime after that, I dozed off and had this dream.

I was looking into a mirror that was in my bedroom closet, brushing my hair with my hands.  Suddenly a clump of hair came out into my hand.  I was understandably upset.  My hair is one of my signature features.  More hair fell out.  I went to my bathroom to look in the bigger mirror, and my hair around my ears and the back of my head was gone.  Suddenly, a zoom-in, close-up showed my scalp, and the hair was cut close to the skin, but it was obvious that it had been cut, i.e., with clippers.

I was instantaneously back in my bedroom looking into the mirror in my closet, and I was completely bald.  But I wasn’t upset.  In fact, I ran my hand over my bald scalp and smiled.

Dream ended.

When I woke up, I was confused and slightly worried.  Losing hair so drastically is usually a sign of severe illness such as Diabetes or thyroid dysfunction, or worse, the effects of cancer treatment such as chemo and radiation.  I have dealt with my hair thinning out due to my thyroid dysfunction, but I’ve been able to regrow my hair now that I have my thyroid and insulin response under control thanks to a superb product.  And I would never do chemo or radiation if I had cancer, so I knew that this was not a precognitive dream, showing me a scene from my future (as I sometimes dream).

Having been immersed in the ballet world growing up, I know a ballerina in rebellion will cut her hair.  Remember when Rosie O’Donnell got her famous haircut and the media crucified her?  I’m not G.I. Jane or Sinead O’Connor.  I wouldn’t look good bald.  So I consulted the wonderful world of Google for some dream meanings to make sense of this dream that threatened to rock my body and cranial image.

Losing one’s hair in a dream spells gloom and doom according to some interpretations (particularly the religious interpretations).  But my dreams are never as concrete as many of the standard interpretations anyway, and I quickly found several interpretations that resonated with me and my current situation.

Losing power was associated with losing hair throughout the various interpretations, but they also noted that the hair that has fallen out (or been cut off) represents something you no longer need.  So losing a clump of hair could be a sign of getting rid of something that no longer serves you or an end to a stressful time of your life.  They also mentioned that losing hair to the point of baldness could signify a whole new chapter in your life because when you get rid of all that doesn’t serve you, you are left with a blank canvas — a bald head, in this case — to start over.  They note that being bald was seen as a sign of wisdom in some ancient cultures, as priests and sages would shave their heads to show they were on a path of knowledge and wisdom. The best explanation said, “You are at a stage in your life where you are confident in fully exposing yourself.” Hmmmmmmm…..

One important thing was whether the hair was falling out on its own or was cut off.  My zoom-in, close-up, Mr. DeMille shot clearly showed that my hair had been shorn off with clippers.  In effect, I was purposely getting rid of things that no longer served me.  I was purposely on a path to greater knowledge and, hopefully, greater wisdom.

I can only go by what I felt when I woke up.  And with this dream, though I was a little shaken at seeing myself bald, I did not have any bad feelings upon thinking about the dream.  This was one reason I didn’t freak out … like I did after the time I dreamt of all my teeth falling out.  Yikes!

This dream is accurate in my opinion.  Since I’m still processing my Congressional run and getting my personal life and my self back on track for what I should be doing with my life, I can see how this is a good dream to have.  My existence will be uncomfortable as I move forward and let go of the things (and people) that do not enrich my life or my work, but the path (to knowledge and wisdom) is most definitely a path I want to take.

trish

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NEWS: Register for Tantra-based Orgasm Awakening Online Workshop


tantra_sexI am now offering group and private Tantra-based training via Skype in 6 two-hour classes.  Finally!

This training focuses on awakening sensual response, increasing sexual pleasure, reclaiming your body as yours, honoring the sacred nature of the body as a means of enlightenment, and connecting to universal consciousness.

The 6 group classes will be held on Thursday nights at 9 p.m. ET (8 p.m. CT/ 6 p.m. PT) beginning July 24, 2014.  If taking the group course by yourself, the cost is $99, and it’s only $149 for couples.

Private classes can be arranged at the convenience of the participant(s).  Six sessions for a Single is $589.00, and Couples will be $879.00.

This workshop will incorporate the philosophy of Tantra along with anatomy and biology, the science of orgasm, exercises, journaling, homework in between classes, with plenty of time for Q&A during the classes.

This training is holistic in nature and covers other aspects of your well-being, such as emotional happiness, fitness, nutrition, physical health, and relationships.  This workshop is part of a larger project that I am developing but can’t mention to the public at this time.  But SOON!

More classes will be provided in the near future, but this introductory class is required for the intermediate and advanced levels.  Sexual orientation does not matter.  But you MUST BE 18 to participate.

You may sign up for the Group or Private classes either as a Single or as a Couple on the ArousedWoman website.

ALL SALES ARE FINAL.  Any questions should be directed to me PRIOR to purchasing any option.  Use the form below.

I look forward to helping you on your journey!

trish

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OpEd: Summer Solstice – 18 Years a Witch


Trish 2012 -- 1000px Today is June 21, 2014, and it marks 18 years since I self-initiated as a witch.  The ritual took place in my backyard with a number of fellow witch-friends in attendance, along with too many mosquitoes and June Bugs to count.

I had been on this road to witchdom for a couple of years, having searched for a spiritual tradition that was in keeping with my ancient Gaelic ancestors.  I was even in a coven for a while, but their tradition was American eclectic and had way too much Wicca and ceremonial hogwash for my tastes.  Unofficially, I had been on this path my whole life; it had only been a couple years prior to my self-initiation that I had begun to take on the mantle of witch and pagan.

As I related in my Samhain post, being a witch in reality is nothing like what TV and movies pretend it is.  “Witch” is usually used as an insult, particularly against women.  This past Samhain, I bought a sign that says, “You say I’m a Witch … like it’s a bad thing.”  And for me, the word “witch” is utterly fabulous.

The word witch is thought to derive from a Germanic root word that alternately can mean “to be strong” and/or “to know” or “to be wise”.  The term witch was used to refer to the local wise woman, the woman who knew the healing arts, midwivery, burial preparations, and often, relationship advice.  Witches were the keepers of arcane knowledge from birth to death, and that scared the men in charge of Europe’s misogynistic religion and governments.  Insecure men have always feared women’s ability to create life, and that fear was never greater than in the centuries of patriarchal rule before modern science could explain some of the mysteries of human biology.

I have often said that someday I hope to be able to call myself, fully, a witch — to truly be a wise woman.  I’ve found that it takes much more than just calling yourself a witch to actually be a true witch.  I’m not talking about covens and initiations either.  You’re a person who strives to live in a wise way, a beauty way, the “Red Road”, according to the laws of Nature and Karma, or you don’t.

Trish-Causey-Mississippi-Pagan-Pride-Day-2004Many arguments can be made over who is a real witch and who isn’t.  That’s another reason I left a coven and ventured out on my own.  I just wanted to do what felt right to me and was in keeping with my Irish and Scottish heritage.  Along the way, I’ve studied many religions, and I’m particularly smitten with the teachings of Indian religions as they pertain to enlightenment, reincarnation, and expansion of universal consciousness.  While I will call myself an Energist, for reasons I’ll explain in another post, there is no actual name for what I do — it’s just Trish Witchyness.

Recently, an instructor from Pittsburgh University interviewed me for some doctoral work he is doing.  He wanted to know about my spiritual path and how I do my “thang” as a solitary witch.  We talked for several hours over the course of a few days, and it was a great conversation that brought back many memories along my journey.

I recounted a tale from when I was a child, about seven years old, when my mother wanted me to stop making mud pies in the backyard to get ready for church.  I asked why we had to go to church.  She said it was to worship god in his house.  I asked her why we had to go to church to worship god because a church was made by men while the earth and water I was concocting into mud pies was actually made by god.  Furious that I was questioning her religious bullshit, she growled for me to get inside and get cleaned up, and away to man’s building we went.

When I was nine, I was forced to become Catholic.  I knew instinctively the church was evil.  Maybe it was a past-life memory of being burned at the stake or something … or being an observant child, I could see through the hypocrisy and the double standards of the Catholic church when my mother, the recreational martyr, fell for all of it hook, line, and sinker.  One day when I was 10, I asked one of the priests, “Which is worse: always to believe and never to question, or always to question and never to believe?”  He sputtered, clearly unable to answer me, then a moment later began spewing some dogmatic drivel that I could tell even he knew was inadequate.

I hated the Catholic church, I hated my mother, I hated Catholic school, I despised it all.  When I was 17, I graduated from Catholic school, and I vowed never to return to the church.  I almost did not attend my best friend’s wedding because it was a wedding mass.  So was my sister’s.

At age 17, my life changed when I met an American Indian ballet dancer at a major competition.  His poetry about his spirit animal connected directly to the heart of me.  But I’m not Indian.  He suggested I begin searching for answers with my heritage, and so my journey into the incredible world of the Gaelic people and spirituality began.  I knew I was home as I learned more and more about pre-Christian Ireland and Scotland.  Even with the invasion of Christianity on the Gaelic peoples, many of the traditional stories and customs had survived.  Considering how much of the pagan culture was absorbed and outright stolen by the Christian church, finding the links back to pre-Christian European spirituality is doable and documentable.

When I was 21, I volunteered with a ballet company in New Orleans.  One day, I decided to go inside a huge cathedral — St. Patrick’s, I think it was.  I went to one of the last pews and knelt.  And waited.  And waited.  And waited.  I looked around.  Nothing.  I bowed my head.  Nothing.  I looked at the shiny brass and gold trinkets, and the porcelain statues, and the stained glass, and the wooden reproduction of Jesus on the cross.  And felt nothing.  I began crying.  Because I felt nothing.  I left.  Still crying.  I wanted to belong somewhere, and this was never going to be it.

Trish Causey Autumn Queen CollageI didn’t have a name for what I was or what I believed at that time.  About a year later, a theatre friend asked if I’d heard of Wicca.  I hadn’t, but when I looked into it at the library and bookstore (this was pre-internet), I resonated with some of what I read, but not all of it.  Some of Wicca seemed as regimented and hierarchical as the dogmatic church I despised.  Turns out that Wicca was founded by two former Anglicans.  And as another friend used to joke, “Episcopal is just Catholic with an ‘E’.”

It was that journey (and the dawn of the internet) that allowed me to find other soul-path querents who go by many names: Wicca, Witches, Pagans, Neo-Pagans, Druids, Eclectic, Ceremonial Witches, Asatru, etc.  Too many to list.  The coven didn’t work out, but it allowed me to see what I didn’t want on my path.  I left in the Spring, and it was that Summer Solstice that I held my self-initiation in my backyard on June 21, 1996.

Walking the witchy path has not been easy, especially considering I live in Mississippi.  Being “out of the broom closet” has been a challenge from Day 1.  I have endured personal taunts and threats, rude comments left on my vehicle (thanks to my “Born Again Pagan” bumper sticker) whenever I went to the store, work, the post office, the gas station.  I even lost a job because I wasn’t Christian.  But like any other closet a person chooses to come out of, being free trumps being a slave to the ignorance of others, especially here in the Bible Belt.

Witchcraze-by-Trish-Causey-ASCAP-sq-300I composed a musical, Witchcraze, to correlate the terrorizing good ol’ boys of the Bush regime with the torturous witch trial masterminds of 1692 Salem.  Having studied in depth the arrest warrants, the trial transcripts, and the re-trial transcripts, I can say for a fact that nothing I have endured comes close to what was done to the women of previous centuries, when “witch” was a label that carried heinous torture and a death sentence.

So, I’m a witch.  And I’m a pagan.  And an Energist.  And a tarot card reader.  And a Libra.  And a Tatrika and yogini.  And a composer, and a nerd, and a bookworm, and a Democrat, and a Streisand devotee, and a single-mom, and a wannabe chef and cafe-owner, and a kettlebell enthusiast, and I’m right-handed.  Pick any of those labels, and someone is going to have a problem with me because of how they perceive that word and what they think it stands for.

I am a writer: a lover of words and sounds and syllables.  I know what “witch” means, and to me, witch is a beautiful word.  Witch is a sacred word.  Witch is a word women (and men) have died for, and it is a word I choose for my goal in this lifetime: to be a wise woman, to be a strong woman, to live a life of expansion and understanding.  Most of all, hearing or seeing the word witch makes me feel something.  I feel a connection to all the women (and men) who defied oligarchical, elitist oppression to live and die free as freethinkers and religious and political dissenters.  And that makes my activist heart proud.

Aroused and witchy,

trish

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TOD: Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga Closing Prayer


WarriorI am a big fan of Pattabhi Jois’ Ashtanga Vinyasa yoga practice.  I love the physicality of it — having danced in ballet and the theatre for almost 20 years (not counting ethnic and belly dancing), my body really responds to the physical demands of Ashtanga Vinyasa yoga.  I recently got back into it…. and I’m so sore…. :-)

I make sure to distinguish between ashtanga, which means “eight limbs” and refers to the eight “steps” or “branches” of yoga: yama, niyama, asanas, pranayama, pratyahara, dharana, dhyana, and samadhi, and Jois’ yoga practice that he called Ashtanga Vinyasa.

As I have just begun my campaign for United States Congress, I am stepping up my personal activism to a whole new level of engagement.  And so, I wanted to post Jois’ closing prayer that is sung at the end of every Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga class:

Om
Svasthi Praja Bhyaha Pari Pala Yantam
Nya Yena Margena Mahim Mahishaha
Go Brahmanebhyaha Shubamastu Nityam
Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu
Om Shanti Shanti Shantihi

Which translates to this:

“May the rulers of the earth keep to the path of virtue
For protecting the welfare of all generations.
May the religious, and all peoples be forever blessed.
May all beings everywhere be happy and free.
Om, peace, peace, perfect peace.”

A-women!  (Okay, I added that bit right there.)

trish

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